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Leaks, Drips, and Spills

25 Nov 2011
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In lawmaking, "caption bills" that propose minor changes in law with simplistic titles (the bait) are introduced to the legislature with the ultimate objective of substantially changing the wording (the switch) at a later date in order to try to smooth the passage of a controversial or major amendment. Rule changes are also proposed (the bait) to meet legal requirements for public notice and mandated public hearings, then different rules are proposed at a final meeting (the switch), thus bypassing the objective of public notice and public discussion on the actual rules voted upon. While legal, the political objective is to get legislation or rules passed without anticipated negative community review.
  From Wikipedia - "Bait and Switch"
21 Nov 2011
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They must, really!

In the FAQs section of the New York Charities Bureau, this Q & A is presented:

Q. Does the board have to keep minutes of its meetings?

A.  A corporation is obligated to keep, at the office of the corporation, correct and complete minutes of all meetings, including those conducted face to face and over the telephone, of its members, board and executive committee, if any.

Note: The emphasis is mine. The above FAQ is a simple summary of the New York Law which states:

ยง 621. Books and records; right of inspection; prima facie evidence.

(a) Except as otherwise provided herein, every corporation shall keep, at the office of the corporation, correct and complete books and records of account and minutes of the proceedings of its members, board and executive committee, if any, and shall keep at such office or at the office of its transfer agent or registrar in this state, a list or record containing the names and addresses of all members, the class or classes of membership or capital certificates and the number of capital certificates held by each and the dates when they respectively became the holders of record thereof. A corporation may keep its books and records of account in an office of the corporation without the state, as specified in its certificate of incorporation. Any of the foregoing books, minutes and records may be in written form or in any other form capable of being converted into written form within a reasonable time.

So, correct and complete minutes.What's the problem? The minutes are correct and complete aren't they?